Observatorio de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico


  • REVISTA SATHIRI

    Volumen: 1, Numero: 8, Páginas: PP. 205-218

    APRENDIZAJE COOPERATIVO UTILIZANDO TECNOLOGIAS DE LA INFORMACION Y COMUNICACION (TICS) EN UNA CLASE DE IDIOMA EXTRANJERO: PERCEPCIONES DE LOS ESTUDIANTES UNIVERSITARIOS

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand activated transcription factors with crucial functions in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, anti-inflammatory processes, placental development, and are involved in cognitive functions and neurodegenerative diseases. Polymorphisms in PPAR genes are shown to influence the activity of these receptors. AIMS: 1) To examine the association of PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphism in pregnant women and their offspring on infant's neurodevelopmental outcomes during the first 18 months of life; 2) to determine the influence of Pro12Ala polymorphism on fatty acid concentrations in plasma phospholipids and placental tissue. STUDY DESIGN: 138 mother-infant pairs from the PREOBE observational study were genotyped for PPARG Pro12Ala. Plasma phospholipids and placental fatty acid concentrations were measured at delivery. Infants' neuropsychological assessment at 6 and 18 months of age was performed using Bayley III. RESULTS: The effect of Pro12Ala on infant's neurodevelopmental outcomes was detected at 18 months, but not at 6 months of age. 18 months old infants born to mothers with wild-type Pro12 genotype had better cognitive (OR=5.11, 95% CI: 1.379-18.96, p=0.015), language (OR=3.41, 95% CI: 1.35-11.24, p=0.044), and motor development scores (OR=4.77, 95% CI: 1.243-18.33, p=0.023) than the Ala allele carriers. Pro12Ala variants did not seem to affect fatty acids concentrations in blood nor in placenta at delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Infants born to mothers with Pro12 genotype have better neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age than Ala allele carriers, indicating a long-term transplacental action of PPAR? variants on foetal brain development. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01634464. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


    Keywords


    Early programming; Neurodevelopment; PPARG polymorphism; PPAR?


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